Posts tagged Mobile

iPhone Could Not Be Activated: iOS 7 Developer Accounts Expired

This happened to me over the weekend. I had iOS 7 Beta 6 loaded on my iPhone 5, and Apple decided to expire the developer’s license. Fortunately I found this fix.

OK, Glass: I Can't Walk, So Help Me Explore

Yet another use case for Google Glass. Can’t wait to get a pair.

Timehop is great
lilly:

Timehop has become one of my very favorite things about digital life lately. We’re not investors, but I love what their team has built, because it’s so essentially human.
As I described to Jonathan, what happens about every other day, sometime in the morning, is that my wife or I sees a note/picture/tweet from a few years ago — when our son was 2 or 3 or 4 — and we send it to the other. In that way, Timehop is helping us connect with each other to remember some of our fondest memories together. 
It’s emblematic of why I love this wave of mobile technology, too — because we have our devices with us all the time, and they can capture images and feelings so quickly and thoughtlessly, they’re becoming more human, and helping us connect. 
I do worry some about how technology yanks us out of our present contexts, and I think it’s important to be intentional about issues like that, but these moments of connection, as more and more of our artifacts are digital — and therefore ubiquitous, retrievable, searchable & shareable — well, that’s a pretty special thing for sure.
Thanks so much to Jonathan & folks at Timehop — you’ve helped us to remember and talk about and laugh about and cry about many of the most important moments over the last few years. 

Timehop is great

lilly:

Timehop has become one of my very favorite things about digital life lately. We’re not investors, but I love what their team has built, because it’s so essentially human.

As I described to Jonathan, what happens about every other day, sometime in the morning, is that my wife or I sees a note/picture/tweet from a few years ago — when our son was 2 or 3 or 4 — and we send it to the other. In that way, Timehop is helping us connect with each other to remember some of our fondest memories together. 

It’s emblematic of why I love this wave of mobile technology, too — because we have our devices with us all the time, and they can capture images and feelings so quickly and thoughtlessly, they’re becoming more human, and helping us connect. 

I do worry some about how technology yanks us out of our present contexts, and I think it’s important to be intentional about issues like that, but these moments of connection, as more and more of our artifacts are digital — and therefore ubiquitous, retrievable, searchable & shareable — well, that’s a pretty special thing for sure.

Thanks so much to Jonathan & folks at Timehop — you’ve helped us to remember and talk about and laugh about and cry about many of the most important moments over the last few years. 

Samsung’s Galaxy S IV Will Scroll Content Based On Eye Movement, Report Says

Samsung is about to show off a new flagship phone at an event on March 14, and details continue to leak out about the new smartphone. The New York Times’ Brian X. Chen reports today that eye movement-based content scrolling will be among the Galaxy S IV’s features. Chen’s source, a Samsung employee, also says that the emphasis will be on software, not hardware at the upcoming press event.

Samsung’s next smartphone will be able to track a user’s eyes and scroll articles and other types of content based on where they’re focused, the source said, so that if a user was reading a web page and hit the bottom, the device could automatically scroll more content up into view. There’s no guarantee it will be demoed on stage, according to the article, but the Korean company should be showing off more new software features, instead of demoing hardware advancements.

MyRatePlan.com Predicts the Top 5 Best Selling Cell Phones of 2013

A MyRatePlan press release ranking its predictions for the top 3 most popular phones of 2013.

Today, MyRatePlan.com, one of the leading mobile phone information and comparison resource on the web, announced its predictions for the top five most popular smartphones of 2013. MyRatePlan based its rankings on a number of factors including historical manufacturer sales data, revisions to already popular handsets, consumer demand, anticipated features, and general buzz surrounding the phones to determine next year’s best-selling phones.

Rising cell phone bills taking bigger bite out of family budgets

An NBC Minneapolis segment on MyRatePlan.com on how to lower your cell phone bill. My interview starts at the 1:40 mark.

Instagram? Cinemagr.am is my new favorite app

Cinemagr.am allows you to take a short video, and only select one part of it to actually be animated, so that the rest of it looks like a picture.

Yesyes


Created with cinemagr.am

Resistance Is Futile: Why Facebook Acquisitions Tend to Actually Work

A good PandoDaily article on why the Instagram acquisition is different than most Facebook acquisitions, and why it will be interesting to watch.

But implicit to this happy reality, that acquired hands make huge contributions to Facebook, is the sad reality that the acquired companies and projects also largely fall by the wayside. My sense is Facebook is usually pretty up front that this will happen.

And that’s why this acquisition of Instagram will be so interesting to watch. Because it wildly deviates from the playbook that has worked so well. Instagram disappearing and Kevin Systrom starting to work on new Facebook photos for mobile is just not an option, if Instagram is going to successfully meld into the Hacker borg. As we discussed yesterday, Instagram retaining its independence was as important to founder Kevin Systrom as the nosebleed price tag.

Can Instagram play a huge role in Facebook’s success without sacrificing the product so many people love?

I think it can.

Is it a condom or is it an Android?
parislemon:

joshuanguyen:

(via What’s in a Name? | The Intercom Blog)

It all makes sense now…

Is it a condom or is it an Android?

parislemon:

joshuanguyen:

(via What’s in a Name? | The Intercom Blog)

It all makes sense now…

Prompts

parislemon:

It’s hard to argue against stories like this and this because any nut job can accuse you of being anti-privacy or an apologist. These stories have some merit, but come on. At what point does this stop? We’re coming up on a year of these types of stories. Next up — BREAKING: Android and iOS can access your processor core. 

Nilay Patel has the best response I’ve seen yet:

Android and iOS are operating systems that run on computers. Granted, these computers are smaller than the ones you grew up with, but they’re still computers. And guess what? In many ways, they work like computers have in past — including the ability of accessing your other files. It’s a feature, not a bug. 

I get that mobile devices are the most personal forms of computing yet. And anytime you say that anything or anyone can “secretly copy” your photos, you’re going to get people running for the hills (and more importantly, reading your story).

Not everything done in computing is intended to be nefarious. At some point, you simply have to trust that someone — be it Apple, Google, or an app developer — isn’t out to screw you over. Likewise, when you leave your house each day, you have to trust that you’re not going to be mugged. You may well be, but you can’t live your life in fear of it or you’d never leave your house. 

The New York Times apparently wants us to have smartphones that prompt you to make sure you want to turn them on, prompt you to make sure you want to open an app, prompt you to make sure you want to send a tweet, prompt you to make sure you want to jump from an app to a web page, prompt you to make sure you want to adjust the brightness (a stranger may be able to read your phone more easily over your shoulder!!).

We’re one step away from a call for apps that prompt you if you’d like a prompt about something. Excuse me while I go hide in a hut in the woods and write a manifesto.